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Bramley's Seedling Apple on G.935 (Spring 2022)


A highly acidic heirloom baking apple treasured in British cooking. Also known as Bramley, Bramley's, Bramleys.

Bramley's, or "Bramley" produces a vigorous, spreading tree that is highly resistant to apple scab. It is a heavy and regular cropper, ripening in early to mid-October in upstate NY, and it is also a partial tip bearer. As a triploid Bramley should not be used as a pollenizer, and it will require two diploid trees for full fertility. Although it is hardy to zone 4, the buds and blossoms are rather frost susceptible and it will have greater success when cultivated in zones 5 and higher.

In 1809 a young woman named Mary Brailford planted a handful of apple seeds, one of which thrived and grew into the first Bramley tree. The fruit produced by this tree was a huge, flattish green apple streaked with red, which by 1900 had become a favorite culinary apple in Britain and Ireland. The thick skin gives way to firm, juicy, creamy yellow flesh. In contrast to Calville Blanc (the culinary apple of France), Bramley is valued for the melting, binding quality of its flesh when cooked down. The resulting pulp is fluffy and light, and it has an outstanding tangy flavor. Although the juice is somewhat one dimensional, the high acid content also lends itself to cider blending. Bramley stores well, but it does tend to develop an unappealing greasy skin quite quickly. (From WSU: Tannin (percent tannic acid): 0.09; Acid (percent malic acid): 0.11; pH: 3.12; SG: 1.045; oBrix 11.2.)

The original tree that Mary planted was blown over by a storm in the early 1900s, but fortunately a branch took root and survived. The tree can be seen at 75 Church Street, Southwell, Nottingham, where an annual Bramley Apple Festival is celebrated every October. Bramley apples from County Armagh in Ireland have been granted Protected Geographical Indication status within the European Union.

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Bramley's, or "Bramley" produces a vigorous, spreading tree that is highly resistant to apple scab. It is a heavy and regular cropper, ripening in early to mid-October in upstate NY, and it is also a partial tip bearer. As a triploid Bramley should not be used as a pollenizer, and it will require two diploid trees for full fertility. Although it is hardy to zone 4, the buds and blossoms are rather frost susceptible and it will have greater success when cultivated in zones 5 and higher.

In 1809 a young woman named Mary Brailford planted a handful of apple seeds, one of which thrived and grew into the first Bramley tree. The fruit produced by this tree was a huge, flattish green apple streaked with red, which by 1900 had become a favorite culinary apple in Britain and Ireland. The thick skin gives way to firm, juicy, creamy yellow flesh. In contrast to Calville Blanc (the culinary apple of France), Bramley is valued for the melting, binding quality of its flesh when cooked down. The resulting pulp is fluffy and light, and it has an outstanding tangy flavor. Although the juice is somewhat one dimensional, the high acid content also lends itself to cider blending. Bramley stores well, but it does tend to develop an unappealing greasy skin quite quickly. (From WSU: Tannin (percent tannic acid): 0.09; Acid (percent malic acid): 0.11; pH: 3.12; SG: 1.045; oBrix 11.2.)

The original tree that Mary planted was blown over by a storm in the early 1900s, but fortunately a branch took root and survived. The tree can be seen at 75 Church Street, Southwell, Nottingham, where an annual Bramley Apple Festival is celebrated every October. Bramley apples from County Armagh in Ireland have been granted Protected Geographical Indication status within the European Union.


The Fruit

Fruit Type

Category: Apple
Subcategory: Heirloom, Cider, Disease-Resistant, Cold-Hardy

Fruit Uses & Storage

Uses: fresh eating, cider, baking, storage, jelly
Cider classification: sharp
Storage duration: three plus months (approximate, depending on storage conditions)

Fruit Appearance

Skin color: green
Flesh color: white

Fruit Origins

Parentage: unknown
Origin: Nottinghamshire, England
Introduced in: 1809
Introduced by: Mary Brailsford

The Environment

Calendar & Geography

USDA zones: 4 - 7
Chill hours: 1000
Ripening date: Oct 13 (approximate, in New York State) + 28 days after McIntosh

Tree Height & Spacing

Rootstock: G.935 Rootstock
Rootstock size class: Semi-Dwarf (40% of Standard)
Tree spacing (natural spread of tree): 12'
Good for wildlife planting? N

Diseases & Pests

Apple Scab: Very Resistant
Cedar-Apple Rust: Resistant
Fireblight: Resistant
Powdery Mildew: Resistant

Pollination

Pollination Factors

Bloom group: 3
Is it self-fertile? N
Is it fertile? N
Ploidy: Triploid
Rootstock size class: Semi-Dwarf (40% of Standard)

Pollination Partners

This table shows the first few results from a full search for pollenizers of Bramley's Seedling Apple on G.935. Please see our Pollenizer Search to run other queries and read how the application uses various factors. Also read more about fruit tree pollination.

Tree Ships Currently in Stock
Galarina™ X-4982 CV. Apple on G.969 2022 382
Pixie Crunch® Apple on G.935 2022 298
Pixie Crunch® Apple on G.210 2022 200
Liberty Apple on G.969 2022 189
Winecrisp™ Apple on G.202 2022 160
Pink Lady® Cripps Pink CV. Apple on G.935 2022 100
Winecrisp™ Apple on G.210 2022 69
Honeycrisp Apple on G.202 2022 67
Stoke Red Apple on G.969 2022 55
Enterprise Apple on G.202 2022 49
Sansa Apple on G.210 2022 48

See all pollination matches for Bramley's Seedling Apple on G.935






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