Skip to main content

Newtown Pippin Apple on G.890 (Spring 2022)


A storied American heirloom apple with excellent keeping quality. Also known as Albemarle Pippin, Yellow Newtown.

The tree is hardy to zone 4, biennial tending, and somewhat slow to bear. Newtown Pippin is susceptible to apple scab and moderately susceptible to all other major apple diseases.

This heirloom is a late-harvested, medium-large, flattish round, green-skinned, yellow-tinged, slightly russeted apple with a remarkably balanced sweet-tart flavor and an aroma often described as piney. Newtown Pippin is an heirloom noted for the quality of the fresh and fermented cider it yields, its superior baking qualities, its excellence as out-of-hand eating apple, and its ability to mellow and improve in flavor with storage.

Newtown is reported to have first been found growing as a seedling on the estate of Gershom Moore in Newtown (now Elmhurst), Queens, NY, but when it arrived in Virginia, it was given the name Albemarle. It was a favorite of several founding fathers including George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson, who grew them at Monticello and who wrote from Paris, "They have no apples here to compare with our Newtown Pippin." During the 19th century, the Newtown Pippin experienced significant commercial success. It was part of the Select List of Apples kept by the Horticultural Society of London in 1807 and commanded the highest prices at Covent Garden. Queen Victoria so favored them that the British Parliament lifted the import duty on Newtown Pippins until World War I. In more recent history, the pomologist Tom Burford has included Newtown Pippin in his list of Top 20 Dessert Apples.

Perhaps the most interesting of the many stories surrounding Newtown Pippin is the tale of its journey to Virginia. On July 7, 1755, General Braddock and his forces were severely defeated in battle against a French fort in eastern Pennsylvania. Among his troops was a militia from Virginia that was commanded by a young George Washington, who sought winter refuge in Philadelphia. There was also a physician named Captain Thomas Walker from Castle Hill, Albemarle, Virginia. It was this Captain Walker who, before heading back to Virginia, filled his saddlebags with tree cuttings that included Newtown Pippin wood, which he propagated on his return to Albemarle. For some time later it was thought that the Albemarle and the Newtown Pippin were distinct trees, but it has since been concluded that differences in appearance and taste are due to soil and climate conditions rather than varietal differences.

Order Your Trees

Select a shipping year

Select a grade

$39.75

6 in stock
Quantity
Best Pricing

Log in to your account to access the best pricing based on your past purchases; also see wholesale information

Tree Grading

Grade is a measure of tree size at time of sale, with Grade 0 being the biggest; see pricing & grading

Custom Trees

For large orders to be delivered in future years, or for trees from your cuttings, you can order custom trees

Need Help?

Contact us


The tree is hardy to zone 4, biennial tending, and somewhat slow to bear. Newtown Pippin is susceptible to apple scab and moderately susceptible to all other major apple diseases.

This heirloom is a late-harvested, medium-large, flattish round, green-skinned, yellow-tinged, slightly russeted apple with a remarkably balanced sweet-tart flavor and an aroma often described as piney. Newtown Pippin is an heirloom noted for the quality of the fresh and fermented cider it yields, its superior baking qualities, its excellence as out-of-hand eating apple, and its ability to mellow and improve in flavor with storage.

Newtown is reported to have first been found growing as a seedling on the estate of Gershom Moore in Newtown (now Elmhurst), Queens, NY, but when it arrived in Virginia, it was given the name Albemarle. It was a favorite of several founding fathers including George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson, who grew them at Monticello and who wrote from Paris, "They have no apples here to compare with our Newtown Pippin." During the 19th century, the Newtown Pippin experienced significant commercial success. It was part of the Select List of Apples kept by the Horticultural Society of London in 1807 and commanded the highest prices at Covent Garden. Queen Victoria so favored them that the British Parliament lifted the import duty on Newtown Pippins until World War I. In more recent history, the pomologist Tom Burford has included Newtown Pippin in his list of Top 20 Dessert Apples.

Perhaps the most interesting of the many stories surrounding Newtown Pippin is the tale of its journey to Virginia. On July 7, 1755, General Braddock and his forces were severely defeated in battle against a French fort in eastern Pennsylvania. Among his troops was a militia from Virginia that was commanded by a young George Washington, who sought winter refuge in Philadelphia. There was also a physician named Captain Thomas Walker from Castle Hill, Albemarle, Virginia. It was this Captain Walker who, before heading back to Virginia, filled his saddlebags with tree cuttings that included Newtown Pippin wood, which he propagated on his return to Albemarle. For some time later it was thought that the Albemarle and the Newtown Pippin were distinct trees, but it has since been concluded that differences in appearance and taste are due to soil and climate conditions rather than varietal differences.


The Fruit

Fruit Type

Category: Apple
Subcategory: Heirloom, Cider, Cold-Hardy, Hot-Climate

Fruit Uses & Storage

Uses: fresh eating, cider, baking, storage, jelly, sauce
Cider classification: sharp
Storage duration: three plus months (approximate, depending on storage conditions)

Fruit Appearance

Skin color: green
Flesh color: yellow

Fruit Origins

Parentage: unknown
Origin: Newtown, Queens, New York
Introduced in: 1720
Introduced by: Gershom Moore

The Environment

Calendar & Geography

USDA zones: 4 - 8
Chill hours: 700
Ripening date: Nov 03 (approximate, in New York State) + 49 days after McIntosh

Tree Height & Spacing

Rootstock: G.890 Rootstock
Rootstock size class: Half-Standard (60% of Standard)
Tree spacing (natural spread of tree): 18'
Good for wildlife planting? N

Diseases & Pests

Powdery Mildew: Susceptible
Cedar-Apple Rust: Susceptible
Apple Scab: Susceptible
Fireblight: Susceptible
Perennial Canker: Susceptible

Pollination

Pollination Factors

Bloom group: 3
Is it self-fertile? N
Is it fertile? Y
Ploidy: Diploid
Rootstock size class: Half-Standard (60% of Standard)

Pollination Partners

This table shows the first few results from a full search for pollenizers of Newtown Pippin Apple on G.890. Please see our Pollenizer Search to run other queries and read how the application uses various factors. Also read more about fruit tree pollination.

Tree Ships Currently in Stock
Galarina™ X-4982 CV. Apple on G.890 2022 77
Enterprise Apple on G.30 2022 66
Pixie Crunch® Apple on G.890 2022 65
Sansa Apple on G.890 2022 60
Honeycrisp Apple on G.30 2022 42
Repinaldo Do Liebana Apple on G.890 2022 25
Tremlett's Bitter Apple on G.890 2022 21
Dabinett Apple on G.890 2022 14
Kingston Black Apple on G.890 2022 13
Porter's Perfection Apple on G.890 2022 13
Virginia Crab Apple on G.890 2022 12

See all pollination matches for Newtown Pippin Apple on G.890






Featured Products

A few things we're loving right now...

Historic American Fruit Trees

These apples and pears were grown in North America during the Colonial Era and through the time of the American...

Winecrisp™ Apple on G.11

A beautiful purple, late-season, disease-resistant dessert apple.

Flemish Beauty Pear on OHxF 87

A hardy pear with exceptionally good flavor.

Backyard Fruit Trees

Looking for easy-to-grow trees for your home orchard? Choose from these apple, peach, pear, plum, and cherry varieties that...